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. >>> right now, the fallout from the latest revelations on nsa surveilance and what the president knew about the active operations. we're waiting to hear more at the white house briefing about to boo gin. also, right now, the obama care website is down at least across parts of the united states again. we're going to have the details of the problems affecting health care gov and a preview ahead of what could be a tough week for the obama administration. >> right now the ellis island museum is opening once again, seeing its first visitors since it was damaged by hurricane sandy last year. hello, i'm wolf blitzer reporting today from washington. we start with the fallout over the latest revelations about spying at the nsa and tapping of world leaders' phones. the big question people are asking now is, what did the president know and when did he know it. i'm joined by chief national security kurt correspondent jim sciutto who has been covering the story. crux of the controversy is what. >> well, the crux right now is what did the preds know and when. there's some conflicting information out ther
he takes office and a growing outrage over revelations how extensively the nsa has been spying both here and around the world. want to bringing in wolf blitzer out of washington. and wolf, first of all, this is an interesting situation. he is a republican and was covering the white house at the time in march of 2004 when he was the acting attorney general. this story is what a lot of folks talk about. he went to the hospital where that's where the attorney general ashcroft was. he was ill and comie refused to sign off on the domestic wiretapping program that was so controversial back then. there was a lot of pressure for ashcroft to sign and for comie to sign, as well. he said no, i'm not doing this and threatened to resign till he resolved the issue with president bush. now he says that the nsa and not the wiretapping but the spying is okay. that it's actually a reasonable thing to do. is he changing his tone here? >> not really because if you remember, i'm sure you do and a lot of viewers will remember, what he was really upset with and why he went to the hospital bed of then atto
to determine how to carry those out. white house spokesman jay carney warned that critics of nsa surveillance should be careful what they wish for. >> we're one attack away from assessments about what went wrong in our intelligence capabilities and collections. the work that's being done here saves lives. >> reporter: whether listening in on the leaders of close allies such as german chancellor merkel saves lives, the white house didn't have an answer. though it confirmed it is reassessing such high level surveillance as part of its overall intelligence review. on the hill today, european lawmakers went head-to-head with congressional leaders on nsa spying. the head of the delegation told me their discussion was frank. >> you had a very stern message to deliver. >> i think we had a very robust and strong message when we came to congress today. this bill which has come through the allegations is something that's [ inaudible ]. they feel very uneasy. they don't know why it's happening, why our strongest ally is doing it. >> reporter: today, they had more to talk about regarding spain, where the
hill now facing questions about why the nsa is tapping the phones of some of our closest allies. what exactly the president knew about it. will the nsa have to put an end to it? national news, we heard this over and over. if you like your health plan you can keep your health plan. now thousands of americans are finding out that's not true. including our guest, former democratic congressional staffer that has been an enthusiastic proponent of obama care. she said things are changing and she doesn't know why. >>> after six decades of funs and parodies, is "mad" magazine still hooking kids on satire? >>> good afternoon. welcome to "the lead." i'm jake tapper. top intelligence official in the country and the director of the nsa are testifying on capitol hill as we speak. when pressed about report the nsa has been tapping the phones of foreign leaders, even allies, director of national intelligence, james clapper said that's long been par for the course plans and intentions of foreign leaders would be important for the united states to know. >> that's a hearty perennial as long as i have b
is taking heat from world leaders over the spying, nsa spying controversy and the key player in the controversy claims he knows who is to blame upcoming. don't be shy! try some pie! u're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. can i top it with oil cream? excuse me? oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] a slice of pie always sounds better with reddi wip. that's because it's never made wih hydrogenated oil. oh, yeah. [ male announcer ] always made with real cream. the sound of reddi wip is the sound of joy. don't be shy! try some p-- shh! store and essentially they just get sold something. we provide the exact individualization that your body needs. before you invest in a mattress, discover the bed clinically proven to improve sleep quality. the sleep number bed. once you experience it, there's no going back. right now our queen mattress sets are just $1299-our lowest price ever! plus special financing until 2015. only at one of our 425 sleep number stores nationwide. sleep number. comfort individualized. so i deserve a small business credit car
the accountability on the nsa spying issue. here's peter baker's headline. post, bye washington scott wilson, controversies show how obama's inattention to detail may hurt his presidential legacy. we want to get your thoughts on this. republicans, (202) 585-3881. democrats, (202) 585-3880. independents, (202) 585-3882. tweet, @cspanwj. you can also post your comments on facebook or e-mail us. on both fronts on the nsa and the health care law, president obama's! down to this -- i did not know. no president can be aware of everything going on in a sprawling government that he theoretically manage. -- theoretically manages. this constant questions about how much in charge he really is. days, the president's health and human services secretary said that the -- that despite internal concerns in a mr. obama wasn, not told about serious problems with the new row graham's website until it was rolled out this month. said theicials president was not aware that the national security agency was tapping the phone of agngela merkel. opposition lawmakers and pundits have seized on the white house explanat
control after revelation that is u.s. may have spied on german chancellor angela merkel. nsa apparently bugging her phone calls, part of a secret program monitoring dozens of world leaders. the white house says president obama was unaware of the program for nearly five years until it was uncovered over the summer during an internal review by the administration. the nsa denies a report that the president was briefed years ago by the head of the agency releasing this statement. general alexander, he is the head of the nsa, did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor angela merkel nor as he ever discussed alleged operations involving chancellor merkel. news reports, caming otherwise, are not true. so let's talk about it with nina easton, senior editor and washington columnist for "fortune" magazine and fox news contributor. joe trippi was howard dean's presidential campaign manager. he is a fox news contributor. nina, the question is, i guess, you know, if the president didn't know about this, when did he know about it?
. the most damaging thing taken place in the last year is not the fight over the budget, but the nsa controversy, the irs controversy, all that, which is not only been dismissed by the government, but defended by the president saying that, well, that's just them. i didn't do that. nebraska's been punished for these things, and people are beginning to become afraid of the very government, and that's the danger to the democratic system. >> anyone else with a quick comment? >> i think also the kind of spending that happened with the stimulus and how it's very apparent that a lot of federal funding goes towards politically connected groups of people just as well as certain law changes like delaying the employer mandate, but keeping the individual mandate on the books when it comes to the president's health care law. i think people are paying more attention. they have more access to more varied view points on what's happening in washington, and they learn too many of our lawmakers are not representing the interests of the american people well, but their own interests and interest of well
of spanish who have been monitored by the nsa, nothing yet. we have a briefing coming up in an hour or so where we expect questions to be asked. as far as previous allegations we have an anonymous leak to the wall street journal saying that president obama knew nothing about this until this summer when he had an internal review--there wasn't an internal review, he found about it then and immediately put a stop to the spying on german chancellor angela merkel. but other reports say that he knew about the surveillance of angela merkel in 2010. there have been rumbles of how the european governments could be careful because edward snowden may have information about how much cooperation european governments gave to the surveillance. >> as they wrap up meetings on capitol hill, what are they saying after the first meeting emerges. >> reporter: this is part of an european inquiry set up a few months ago. this has been long planned. the first stop at chairman of the house intelligence mike rogers who said he didn't understand what all the fuss was about, that they should be glad europe is spying
to the nsa spying scandal. the president ordering a full review of intelligence operations, specifically where foreign leaders are concerned. let's bring in jim sciutto who's following developments live in washington. >> reporter: the white house taking a hard look at the benefits and costs of this surveillance. this is part of a review that began this summer, the same review which is how the white house said the president first learn of spying on foreign leaders. administration officials saying the president did not know she was a target and would not know specific targets but another u.s. official telling cnn that he would have had to know about the framework of such surveillance programs including the country's target. still very hard questions for the administration to answer here. the president obama would not confirm the nsa was spying on the phone calls of u.s. al lies, like germany's chancellor angela america. but in an interview with fusion, he both defended -- >> the national security operations in generally have one person and that is to make sure that the american people are
frustration within both political parties on capitol hill over just how intrusive the nsa and federal government as a whole are into the lives of every day americans. one leading senator is introducing a bipartisan solution that could be the framework for reform. senate judiciary chairman pat leahy co-authored freedom act with republican congressman jim sensenbrenner. thanks so much for being with me this afternoon, senator. >> glad to be with you. >> you were one of the leading authors of the patriot act in 2011 now you're proposing to ban nsa from collecting bulk data among other things. can you pinpoint the moment you changed your mind about this government surveillance programs and decided these programs needed to be curbed? >> i never really changed my mind. i thought in the patriot act i pushed to make it a lot tighter than it was. i joined with conservative leader of the house dick armey to put sunset provisions in. that's one of the reasons we now have this debate because it forced the congress to review it periodically. but we've reached a point where this seemed to be if we
the "wall street journal report"ed he did learn this summer the nsa was bugging phones of german chancellor angela merkel and other world leaders for nearly five years. followed by a few claims of hhs sebelius obama didn't know about problems of the health care website before the launch. the white house frequently has given a variation on this theme. the question, what did obama know and when did he know it? answer not much and about a minute ago. i mean not much and about a minute ago. and so now we're hearing that from other people that he did know for five years that angela merkel and allies have been -- i mean this is bad. >> the length of time that the program has been under operation or at least the lent of time it has been published with various world leaders. if he did not know, if you choose to believe the president of the united states and i believe the president of the united states, i want to believe the president of the united states. >> some reports suggest he signed off on it. >> if he did not know why didn't he know? the larger question is do we have an out of control nation
's possible the president did not know the nsa was monitoring personal phone calls of 35 world leaders? >> is it possible, sure, it is possible. that's a disturbing fact in itself. the president is left in this awkward position where neither of the two main explanations is all that -- you know, all that appealing. either he didn't know or he did know. either one he gets in trouble. you mention the bush book, which is very nice of you to mention, it does go back to the bush administration. these are the same issues, right, for going on for more than a decade. to have begun in 2002 happened during the run up to the war in iraq. in that time we were bugging delegations at the u.n. trying to get a resolution through about that. what president obama has done inherited surveillance structure he said he was going to change but, in fact, has kept broadly intact. >> yeah. indeed in the "wall street journal" it says officials at the nsa has so many eavesdropping operations under way it wouldn't have been practical to brief him on all of them. these decisions are made at the nsa. the president do
reports the nsa listened in on 60 million phone calls in a single month. in germany, the newspaper records, president obama was briefed by nsa chief keith alexander about spying on angela merkel's calls. the nsa quickly denied the report telling cnn general sander did not discuss with president obama in 2010 an alleged foreign intelligence operation involving german chancellor merkel, nor has he ever discussed alleged operations involving murkle. the nsa says the willingness up to now to deny present and future monitoring. >> i can tell you the president can assure the chancellor, the sungs not and will not 3407b tore the conversations of the chancellor. >> reporter: they are coming to the u.s. to challenge their american counterparts, after breaking quote german law on german soil. house chairman rodgers defended the nsa under surveillance on cnn sunday saying it was both well regulated and essential to keeping both americans and europeans safe from terrorism. >> i think the biggest story here, candy, if the united states intelligence services weren't trying to collect information with u.
of this country's closest allies feel like enemies. it is confirmed that the nsa had been monitoring leaders from 35 nations and the president was not aware of it until this summer. fusion's white house correspondent and tim abala caught up with the president to ask some questions on a tough day. >> you have to suspect that president obama would have preferred to cancel his interview today. in any presidency there are days of hope and promise. >> so help me god. >> congratulations, mr. president. >> and days of triumph. >> the united states has conducted an operation that killed osama bin laden, the leader of al qaeda. >> and then there are days like today. headlines about out of control spying. >> the white house under fire right now given all of these revelations. >> and now sources confirm it was happening apparently without the president's knowledge. and then there is obama care, the website in disarray and the other legacy program, immigration reform, now stalled in partisan politics. this was probably not the day president obama would have chosen to speak one-on-one with abc's new partner,
learning more about the man who open fired in the los angeles international airport. >>> nsa leaker ed ward snowdon would be traveling from russia to germany. >> the pakistani government has demanded a meeting with the u.s. ambassador to protest the drone attack that killed the taliban leader halimullah mehsud. >> a struggle for power for succession. also a serious blow for pakist pakistan, and preliminary talks with the tehriki-i-taliban. the peace prospects are now out of the question, and a big blow is seen to deliver to the taliban pakistan. they will not be able to recover from this any time soon. it will be interesting to see the government of pakistan has asked the security forces to be on red alert. >> joining us now, director for the center of middle east studies at the university of denver. thank you for joining us on this topic, now the pakistan foreign office has summoned the u.s. ambassador to protest this action there are competing interests here, but the interests have to overlap for there to be any success in the region. what do you think is going to come out of this? >> rep
of communication, whether with the fbi or the nsa. with the fbi, you have review in the field office. you would review at the fbi justiceters or, to the department and have a review there. and it would go to fisk and you would have a review there. and thee review meticulousness and the care that people put into these things is substantial. of dialogue back and forth between every level, among every level with this. there is back-and-forth with doj and fbi. i always took it as a huge amount of my response ability to make sure that i maintain at all times the credibility of the justice department in front of the five the court -- fisa court for muscle it was transparent what was going on. and when we made mistakes, as we did, we brought them to the attention of the court and we tried really hard not to make mistakes. it was really the justice doingment in my opinion his job, executing its responsibilities to order the constitution and the delegates were there to make sure that the properly.ecuted we will do our best to make sure it is enforced in the right way. if they have not met the standards,
whether president obama himself knew about the nsa targeting the phones of 35 leaders including u.s. allies, including the german chancellor. he did say that the u.s. knew about the starting and the type of collection that's been done. >> would it be fair to say that the white house should know what those collection priorities are? >> they can and do, but i have to say that that does not necessarily extend to the detail. and we're talking about a huge enterprise here with thousands and thousands of individual requirements. >> this all starts, though, as you recall, with a report in germany's der spiegel that the nsa monitored the german chancellor's cell phone and could be traced back to the nsa whistle-blower edward snowden. glenn greenwald joins us tonight. want to play something vice president dick cheney said to jay tapper when he interviewed him earlier this week. tapper asked him about edward snowden. i want to play what he said. >> the problem with snowden is he had access to classified information. he violated conditions under which they got those. he's a traitor, pure and
. >>> and edward snowden says british counterparts to the nsa are some of the worst offenders to government oversight. >>> welcome to "around the world." police came within minutes of stopping the alleged l.a.x. shooter from heading to the airport before friday's rampage. one. new details we're learning today. this is from an exclusive interview with a woman who knows the suspect and his three roommates. 23-year-old paul ciancia is charged with murdering a tsa officer. ciancia is in critical condition after being shot by police officers. the fbi says he set out to kill tsa employees, and now a woman who knows the suspect tells our miguel marquez, that one roommate, who had no idea what was going on, even drove him to the airport. >> he asked one of the roommates if he could have a ride to the airport. >> why did he need a ride? >> he said he was going back home. either that his dad was kind of sick and he had to deal with some family issues. >> did anyone ever see a ticket? >> no. >> he did mention what day. that morning, he doesn't knock and says, i need to leave. can you take me now. >> d
, google's executive chairman -- there's two kinds of people in the world, those that think the nsa -- that think snowden is a hero or who think he's a scoundrel. >> there are two people in the world. the nsa blasting the nsa over spying reports. google likes to keep all their spying to themselves. they couldn't want other people having their spying information. what the d.o.j. wants u.s. airways and amr to do. as we head to break, the weather channel's alex wallace joins us. 32 degrees this morning, alex. >> cold. yeah. there's no way around it. cold. not just for new york city but the rest of the northeast. very chilly start to things. a lot of 20s in the interior. syracuse to buffalo, 20s. therefore, no doubt about it we have chilled down those numbers. good news is we'll get a chance to warm up as we head through the week. high pressure drifts east and on the west side the winds will turn more out of the south and the south winds are a warming wind. we'll get a chance to see the 60s by mid week. hang in there. we have some showers moving now from parts of mexico into texas. this
coming out swinging. finally someone in the administration defense nsa spying. their defense was clear, and aggressive. >> do you believe that the allies have conducted or at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america our intelligence services our leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> there has not been a mass casualty here in the u.s. since 2001. that's not by luck. they continue to try. it is the great members in the intelligence community, our military, our law enforcement that have stood up and said, this is our job. >> defending themselves with passion and conviction, which up to this point we hadn't seen much of in terms of defense. jim sciutto closely watched the entire hearing today. jim, what were the revelations at the hearing? >> reporter: you got the sense as you say, erin, they were just waiting to go have the chance to push back like this. they pushed back very strong here. first on spying both clapper and alexander saying that our allies spy on us, including on our leaders, that in fact the intelligence services in europe do so to an e
alexander. those reports completely pauls and said it was not the nsa or u.s. in any form that was gathering this data. it was, in fact, european countries doing so. european intelligence services. two, the data was not the content of phone calls or phone calls themselves. this was part of a joint operation, the u.s. and nato allies that have nothing to do with the countries, spain and france, but had do with military operations abroad. >> we will speak to mike rogers. chairman of the house intelligence meeting with me later this hour. jim sciutto for that report. wlaets go to the crisis over obama care. and where it is heading. the official responsible for the obama care website today formally publicly apologized before congress for all of the problems that the users have been having and now into week five. does the president himself own apology for pledges he made repeatedly selling the affordable care act? >> putt like your doctor, you can keep your doctor under the reform proposals we put forward. if you like your private health insurance plan you can keep it if you like the plan you hav
're following for you. want to know about the nsa spying allegations. ellis island opened for the first time since hurricane sandy hit last year. and now there's a new fbi director. spain is now the latest u.s. ally complaining about those american surveillance programs. spain's
the nsa. testifying on capitol hill, top intelligence official said tracking foreign leaders, even allies, is a fundamental given. he said other countries absolutely spy on us. jim sciutto has been following the developments for us in washington. good morning, jim. >> incredible to see the heads of the most secretive organizations in the u.s. speaking out publicly and openly defending surveillance at home and abroad. they said emphatically the white house would have known of the spying but added the president might not have known of specific targets and they fought back hard against story line that the u.s. is the only country in the business of spying on its allies. after enduring weeks of accusations of spying overreach -- >> we want to report -- >> reporter: and even more in the hearing room. >> i'm going to say for the last time that the gentleman all the way on the left would be removed. >> reporter: u.s. intelligence chiefs pushed back, arguing that allies spy on allies. >> have the allies of the united states ever during the course of that time engaged in anything you would qualify
have other news, president obama has reportly ordered the nsa to stop eavesdropping on joe kernen. no, stop eaves dropping on the headquarters of the imf and world bank. the order is said to be the latest move, of course, by the white house to demonstrate its willingness to curb at least some surveillance in the wake of weeks by former nsa contractor edward snowden. >>> a number of comments about janet yellen starting to come from the senate. richard shelby says he would oppose efforts to block her nomination with a filibuster unless some disturbing disclosure emerge. his comments come after senator rand paul said he instead to withhold her nomination. and senator lindsay graham has vowed an effort to block white house nominees until the obama administration comes forward with more information about benghazi. shelby's comments are important because democrats would need to pick up only five republicans vote to clear procedural hurdles and bring yellen's nomination to a full senate vote. yellen's nomination needs only a simple majority. joining us this morning from washington is eamon a
nsa spying and iran's nuclear program. this is 15 minutes. >> afternoon. aftert afternoon -- good noon. jonathan coleman and i just finished a working lunch where we reinforced of the close ties between the united states and new zealand. having fought together in every major conflict of the last century, including afghanistan, our bonds are rooted in common interests but also in the history and values we share. our partnership is important. it is important to peace and prosperity in the asia-pacific and the united states remains committed to strengthening this partnership as one opponent of our rebalance to the region. we emphasized the significant progress we have made in expanding our defense cooperation since the washington declaration was signed last year. in addition to high-level visits like this one, we have had a productive set of exercises and training initiatives. the first joint defense policy talks in almost three decades and a successful meeting of pacific army chiefs from asia- pacific nations, which are two nations -- our two nations cochaired. global peacekeeping operat
allies about nsa spying? >> well, secretary kerry spoke to london audience yesterday via teleconference and said, listen, surveillance has gone too far and blamed tech knoll igy for being on auto pilot. he said hello and the senator discovered the spying after the attack. kerry, of course, is going to have some difficult conversations when he headed to europe in the next few days. >> mar yet ink name you. the faa is finally relaxing the news for electronic devices. they must be in airplane mode or connected to the plane's wi-fi. cbs news' travel editor peter greenburg? in abu dhabi. good morning. >> good morning. for the last couple of years it's been very clear not if they'll relax the rules but when. they'll soon have a gate-to-gate experience using their electronic device meaning they can use them on the ground as long as they're in airplane mode. the real problem here, of course, is when is it going to happen. they have to apply to the faa say that they're capable of doing this. all right duo airlines have done that, jetblue and dell to and then then it's time. they may have to beco
these have occurred. how do i know they occurred? hold on. nsa spies on other people. and so we see what the other people have collected from american companies. of course, the law prevents us from saying here is a big bank. they lost this amount of money. we thought we can't say anything. so the public debate is miss informed in some ways because of a t not established that precisely. there are legal obstacles to information sharing. you've heard about that. i don't know about the antitrust. all the companies say antitrust. i don't know how true it is. the privacy obstacles are more important. there are a few sectors that made progress. i look at financial service and telecom. they made progress because it's in the business interest do better at cybersecurity. other places very little progress. so easy and energetic 12-year-old could probably be a good cyberattacker. i've had some unusual experiences this year. and the one i think the most unusual for me was a big international conference -- which was the shut down? october 17th. i thought people expressing pity for the united. we weren
on edward snowden, the nsa leaker. they are accusing the contractor of billing the government for background checks that it knew were incomplete. >>> officials say five more people are in custody in connection with the deadly terrorist attack on the west gate mall last month. 11 other people are already being held. at least 67 were killed after gunmen stormed the shopping center. >>> the south african olympic runner is facing new charges in the death of his girlfriend. with murder, two gun charges are being added. business store -- business storeus business storious but cl. >>> anderson, look at what happened in milwaukee as a police cruiser is chasing a speeding car. you see there, it swerves off a highway ramp and smashes into a barrier and goes airborne. the driver and the officer were injured. they will be okay. the driver is charged with dui. >> incredible video. amazing. >>> a horrifying story in california. 14 early patients abandoned when the nursing home shut down instead of being moved to a new facility, they were left behind where nearly all of the staff walked out. and a big name
together with nsa's information insurance director, the csp program that dha has goes on and on, and my main point is that private sector and government are working well together. we have align for the right goals, but i don't see a problem in that regard. >> laura? >> yeah, i just want to respond, particularly to dan's points and jim's point. there's a real danger here we think by checking the box we addressed the underlying concern speaking here about privacy. we have a privacy and civil liberties oversight board, no resources, no money, and no teeth; right? the idea we have one, great. we have pias, the records notices, and we have exceptions that are routinely used by dhs and others in sense of the regard of the metric programs. we have a privacy act 40 years old and no longer does what it was set out to do. we have foya with exceptions for gnarl security routinely used to deny reasonable activity. now we've seen with walton releases, and august of this year, it was release reasoning without providing too much information a joshed lying issues, and what we found out is that a secret
was done during the government shutdown and the nsa spying scandal going on and i mean putin is autocratic. he doesn't really answer to anybody and he could be in power until 2026. >> obama had been number one in the prior survey. >> yes. >> as you say, there may be some function of when the polling was actually done and also the fact that putin seemingly maybe outflanked the president over syria which happened in september. >> i would guess that has a huge impact. also one of the criteria they use to vote on this list is, how freely people wield their power and putin seems unconstrained. >> let's talk about newcomers and women. how many women are on the list and who are the most noteble? >> there are nine women on the list this year, up i believe from six last year and there were only three on the list are inaugural year and one of those women is a newcomer, janet yellen, the presumptive new chair of the federal reserve. there are also two africans on the list for the first time ever, including africa's richest man, $16 billion, akeel degota who made his fortune in cement, but he's using
that nsa leaker edward snowden could be granted clemency. i want to bring in benjamin carden. senator carden, glad to have you here, sir. >> alex, good to be with you. >> edward snowden released what he called this manifesto for the truth. he says current debates about spying just prove his revelations are helping bring about change. what's your response to that? >> mr. snowden has caused real damage to this country. the manner in which he has conducted these releases have compromised our national security. as senator feinstein said, there's a way in which a whistleblower can get information to us. we want to make sure there's adequate oversight on the powers of the intelligence community. we need the right balance to keep us safe and protect the rights of americans. so there's concern on how we collect data, but for a person who has been given that access and trust on his own to do this type of release is detrimental to our country. >> sir, as you serve on the senate foreign relations committee, i know you're privy to things we are not necessarily. do you believe what we know so far
have a big place outs dchq, which is a huge listening -- like your nsa, a huge listening -- i'm assuming, as i pay my taxes, that they're listening to everybody. >> yes, i hope so. and who is that lady that -- >> what they're not doing, i'm assuming, is taking notes. i think where we went wrong with the u.s. administration, joe, they wrote it down that they were listen to go angela merkel. >> that's what happens. who's that lady that tells daniel craig what to do? >> m. >> she knows, right? >> yes. i'm just trying to get this straight. the germans, they're rich. the germany at this point is -- it reminds me of cas casablanca. germany has not earned its spying outrage with all of their arms dealings and all the -- anyway, we get involved in everything over here, ross. >> there was a report yesterday, annette talked about it out of frankfurt. there was one report in the german press that said it may -- because of hangovers from the laws post the war, it may not be illegal for the u.s. to spy on the -- to listen in on the german fwoft. so there is some debate about whether the u.
? >> what? >> here's business before the bell. eric schmitt is lashing over the nsa spying on the datacenters. we called it possibly illegal if are proven and said google complained to the president, vice president and congress. schmitt said the bulk data collection if true doesn't pass the smell test and is bad public policy. >> it's outrageous that the nasa security agency was looking between the centers if that's true. the steps that the organization was willing to do without good judgment went to pursue the mission and went to violate the policies. it's not okay. in that case they assisted us in understanding that. >> now a story on blackberry. >> wow. she's good. >> last minute deals and bids. blackberry now says they will abandon trying to sell itself. the toronto globe and mail reports the company will raise $1 billion and clean house of upper management including ceo thorston hinds. >> the best of the late night. keep had here on "morning joe." you're giving away pie? would you like apple or cherry? cherry. oil...or cream? definitely cream. [ male announcer ] never
this is the dangerous world and they're making a world a safer place. >> does all -- does the debate around the nsa and all of the things that they're doing slow down your business? >> no, i wouldn't say it slows it down, it takes a business that's normally not been discussed in the public and it puts it in a public context. and so it makes it a little bit more difficult for the policy makers, i think, that are talking about it. our business is focused on the development of the capabilities associated with it. the difference is -- the wonderful thing about being in the united states, we're very creative, very inventive, we've invented a lot of these technologies that have dual purpose. we can use them to look at adversaries and use them to look at our own -- >> tell us about the technologies. >> well, let's just take cyber, for example. a lot of what we do is computer network defense. there are other parts of our business that might look at somebody else's computer network and look at it from an offensive capability. >> let me ask you this. i know, cliff, when you get involved it's because manageme
pointing out perhaps the more important story, which is the nsa problem that we have. >> i think it's for real. >> how will that impact if -- >> are we the chinese? >> yes. >> you think about wallway and its inability to operate here and we might be treated the same way. >> i think we might be. i think we went rogue on this stuff. >> that may be the more interesting story. >> i totally agree with that. i think that's a huge story for us. >> the ipo buzz continues to build this morning as we wait for container store to open for trade. latest indication, 35 to 39. after that, the company's chairman and ceo kip tindell will join us here at post 9. and ism is on the way in about 15 minutes. did not go away. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 trading inspires your life. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 life inspires your trading. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 where others see fads... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 ...you see opportunities. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're here to help tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 turn inspiration into action. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 we have intuitive platforms tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 to help you discover wh
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